Posts tagged: RDG140

Cricket Renovation

By Grassgroup, August 17, 2015 9:07 am

As we near the end of the cricket season it is important to look forward to cricket pitch renovation. It is necessary to perform such a task very shortly after the last match so as to prevent the square from looking too sparse and to allow optimum regrowth before the next season.

Here at The Grass Group we have compiled some suggestions for renovating your pitch.

 

If you are looking for a complete renovation fraise mowing may be necessary.

The GKB Combinator is an apt machine for such a task, removing the top layer of grass and thatch accumulation.

For a slightly lighter approach, you can use the tractor drawn ED130 which uses its brush to collect as it scarifies. Alternatively, aggressively brushing the pitch to remove soil and debris can begin the process of renovation.

 

 

Aerification of the soil in a linear vertical, horizontal and diagonal fashion is optimal. Lots of smaller little holes tend to provide the best results. It may be necessary to flood the pitch several times in order for the ground to be soft enough for a sarel spiked roller. Our ATT TMSystem range has a sarel spiked roller perfect for the job at hand! If you use a different type of aerator, CTI tines could be complementary.

 

Next comes the OverSeeder. The small holes made during aerification have prepared the soil for the even deep spreading of the seed.

If there are particular areas that have been affected then applying a light coating of loam would be beneficial. OverSeeding can be done on a larger scale using the RGD140 or on a   smaller scale with the Seed Car.

 

 

As always, there are many different ways to renovate a cricket pitch and it is dependent on your preferences, pitch and weather conditions.

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RD150 & SMC150 Wildflower Seeder

By Grassgroup, July 10, 2014 1:20 pm

Landscapers often extol the virtues of wild flower meadows in open spaces (edges of parks, golfcourses, roundabouts etc.) rather than just grass. The idea has gained momentum as it reduces maintenance because flowers don’t need to be cut every 2 weeks like grass does. To prepare a wildflower bed the chances are that you’re starting with rough ground and will therefore need to renovate the ground first with a stoneburier. Afterwards the grass and wildflower seeds will have to be mixed and then sown in the ground. The Rotadairon solution is to carry out the operation in one go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combining a Rotadairon stoneburier with a seeder allows, in one pass, the preparation of the rough ground together with the mixing and then sowing of the grass and wildflower seed.The Rotadairon range of ground renovation equipment grow from pedestrian machines up to large contractor machines of 2 metres wide. The RD150 model is a mid-range, general purpose, machine with a working width of 1.5 metres which can be fitted with an SMC150 seedbox, again a mid-range model from a wide family. The SMC150 has the option of a hopper divider so that you can mix your own percentages of grass/wildflower mix as you go. Alternatively you can do away with the hopper divider and use a pre mixed grass/wildflower mix. In conjunction with Nova Flore, wild flower specialists, the development of the SMC150 was designed to cope with the variable sizes of different species to enable larger areas to be sown mechanically whilst maintaining a consistent spread of varieties.

 

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RotaDairon RGD140 Overseeder

By Grassgroup, June 30, 2014 1:35 pm

With demand for golf year-round and ever higher expectations from members, improving greens is an ongoing task for Greenkeepers. The Grass Group’s Jon Proffitt explains that some clubs are not only overseeding twice a year to take advantage of the best grass growing conditions, but also like to keep on top of turf cover on a more regular basis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Hadley Wood Golf Club near Enfield, Middlesex, has had a lot of success with the Rotadairon RGD 140 overseeder, and Head Greenkeeper Simon Grand uses a rolling programme of overseeding, treating any greens that need it,” he explains.The RGD 140 is used in a cross hatch pattern, with the second pass at 30 degrees to the first, and Simon has reported strong growth after just 10 days, with the first seedlings emerging in less than a week. Hadley Wood is seeking to increase the proportion of bents in its greens, to give a hard wearing playing surface with reduced maintenance requirements. The downside, Jon points out, is that Velvet Bent is a very expensive seed, so wastage must be avoided at all costs.“Fortunately, the RGD 140 has an exceptionally accurate metering system, so Greenkeepers can calculate sowing rates very precisely,” he explains. “Using a dial on the side of the hopper, the correct position is selected for this very fine seed, applying exactly 3kg per green. It’s really easy to use.”At 1.4m wide, it has the capacity to be productive on pitches while being compact enough to work on smaller greens. “It’s such a simple machine to use – once the operator knows the required depth and seed rate, he can set it up in a matter of minutes. Overseeding is an easy and cost effective way of improving turf, and with the right machinery it can fit into the regular maintenance regime for best results.”

 

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Dairon Demos

By Grassgroup, March 14, 2011 4:46 pm

Dairon’s RGD140 is out and about showing that simplicity can be a route to success.

The RGD140 is a product created to meet UK requests for a clean finish overseeder which is compact and simple.  It was Les Howkins, Master Greenkeeper, of Richmond Golf Club that worked with Michel Dairon in fine tuning the machine.

As a machine that is suited to a compact tractor it is readily manoeuvrable around the greens and tees. 

The razor sharp discs insure excellent penetration and their depth are set using the stainless steel front roller.  There are additional removable weights on the disc frame to allow the greenkeeper further adjustment if conditions are unexpectedly tough. 

The seeder is a modular unit used across the whole Dairon range and has an infinitely graduated metering mechanism which is very precise and yet is easy to set.  The seed flows down angled shoots to the foot of the especially designed share or foot which opens the pre cut slot dropping the seed neatly in the groove before it naturally closes and is then rolled closed by the soft rear tyres.  There is almost no seed outside the groove.  The result is seed placed precisely where you want with minimal surface disturbance.

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BTME 2011

By Grassgroup, January 25, 2011 9:01 am

Well what a surprise!  We went wondering if anyone would actually turn up with all the doom and gloom.  We took advice from Tony and Fiona at Pan Publicity and moved to the main entrance and changed our stand layout.  We brought our new products from ATT, the SMARTCut and INFINIPower and our new RGD140 disc seeder and ED130TS scarfier collector from Dairon and waited with baited breath…

 It worked fantastically!  The stand design and layout in front of the only doorway meant everybody saw us and we were showered with compliments.  We needn’t have worried about attendance because it was a better attended show than the previous year and “the big boys” weren’t there.   Late morning Wednesday they were still in two queues going out the door trying to get in!

The SMARTCut and INFINIPower caused real interest and the greenkeepers quickly grasped the flexibility, efficiency and simplicity of combining the two with the existing TM System and the only problem we had was convincing that we were being serious with our low prices!

 The weather we have been having has generated serious problems with winter grass die back so our Dairon demonstration scarifier collector and disc overseeder have been booked up with golf courses wanting to be on top of things in the Spring.

We will no doubt still climb all the hurdles and jump through all the hoops with our greenkeepers in order to help to ensure we get real orders and that our mutual goals are not stifled by over cautious committees  but we have plenty to go at!

The future, and the attempts to turn two or more annual shows into one central indoor and outdoor event still seem to elude the industry which is a great pity because I believe that it ought to be in every bodies long term interest to achieve it.  I am sure it will need a lot more talking before we get any where close.  In the meantime I believe BIGGA can rightly claim that the 2011 show was a great success.

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